Image Gallery   

 

All images exhibited here were taken at the Starsite location. The Gallery will be updated from time to time. New additions will appear in white print. Click on a selected thumbnail image to see the full picture.

GOING TO CHILE. Am in the process of moving my operation to a site at 8,000' in the Atacama Desert

in northern Chile. If all goes well I will begin remote imaging from there this winter.

     
  M1 (Crab Nebula) - Color

A star that appeared as a supernova in the year 1054. The explosion remnants have been traveling outward at the rate of 78 million miles per day since then.

Takahashi CCA-250 Astrograph Telescope with an ST11000/Astrodon filters /F7.5LRGB (15/7minB/W,4/5min2x2binRGB)

  M16 (Eagle Nebula) - Color

The dark figure is in the form of an eagle with its wing spread to the back, and its "talons" seemingly grasping a struggling fish. A fanciful description of a striking star forming nebula in our galaxy. 

12 1/2" Ritchey Chretien Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8 F/7 RRGB (8/7minR, 2/5min 2x2 bin RGB )

  M17 (Swan Nebula) - Color

The beautiful "Swan" nebula lies in the constellation Sagittarius. Its field of ionized hydrogen gas glows red - charged by the ultraviolet energy emitted by the young, hot stars embedded in it. The large "swan" figure is seen moving right to left in the picture. The brightest star on the left forms its "eye".

12 1/2"Ritchey Chretien Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8 F/7 LRGB (3/5min B/W, 1/5 min 2x2 bin RGB) 

  M20 (Triffid Nebula) - Color

Dark dust lanes bisect this glowing , pink area of nebulosity. The bright area in the exact center contains a clutch of newborn stars. Note the "wave" effect seen at the top of the nebula.

12 1/2" Ritchey Chretien Telescope with an ST8e /CFW 8 F/7 LRGB (3/5miB/W, 1/5min 2x2 bin  RGB)

  M27 (Dumbbell Nebula) - Color

Shaped like a dumbbell the gas and debris has been expanding out of the dying star in the exact center of the nebulosity for 48,000 years. Note the green color of the double ionized oxygen present in the expanding gas.

12 1/2" Ritchey Chretien Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8 F/7 LRGB (3/5min B/W, 1/5min 2x2 bin RGB)

  M31 - (Andromeda Galaxy) - Color

The nearest large galaxy to our own. An immense, island universe of stars, gas and dust. Recent estimates place it about 2.5 million light years away. It is blue shifted, and moving towards us. It will eventually collide with the MilkyWay billions of years from now. M31 contains a trillion stars, based on the Spitzer telescope data.

Takahashi CCA-250 Astrograph Telescope with an ST11000/Astrodon filters/F3.6. LRGB(67/5minBW ,9/5min2x2 bin RGB.

  M33 - Color

A nearby spiral galaxy (2.4 million light years) about 1/3rd the size of our own galaxy. Note the pinkish/red areas where new star formation is underway. On the upper right we see the bright HII region NGC604 - so large it could hold 40 of the Orion Nebulas shown below.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8F/6  LRGB (32/7minBW, 5/5min 2x2 bin RGB. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0, G1.0, B1.6).

  M42 - Halpha Color

The "Great Orion Nebula" - a major star forming area in our section of the galaxy. A great cloud of nebulosity surrounds the glowing emission area in the center, where "The Trapezium", a tight grouping of 4 young stars, floods the region with ultraviolet radiation.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretein Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8/F6 HalphaRGB (8/10 sec Halpha,4/10sec RGB each, all 2x2 bin).

  M45 - Color

The Pleaides. The classic "open cluster" example. The group of brilliant, hot "O" type stars has encountered a large scale region of dust in their travels through the galaxy, and their star light is reflecting off the nebulosity. Note the striations, and brush like features near the brighter stars caused by a "play of light" effect.

 

Takahashi CCA-250 Telescope with an ST11000 and Astrodon filters F/3.6. LRGB (21/7min BW, 9/5 min2x2 binRGB.)

  M51 - Color

The "Whirlpool" galaxy is seen rotating in a counter clockwise direction. Note the smaller, yellow galaxy on the left. It has passed quite close to the larger galaxy. This near encounter has resulted in the "plumes" of material coming out of it, and a long arm has been drawn out of the "Whirlpool" towards it.

12 1/2" Ritchey Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8,F/7 LRGB (25/7minBW, 5/5min2x2 bin RG,8/5min2x2B). )

  M57 (Ring Nebula) - Color

The beautiful expanding remnant of a dying star . The "Ring" is the classic example of a planetary nebula object. It is felt that our own sun will die in similar fashion, puffing off its outer shell, in some 5 billion more years

12 1/2" Ritchey Chretien Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8F/7 LRGB(3min B/W, 1/5min 2x2 bin RGB)

  M64-Color

A very curious object called the "Evil Eye Galaxy" because of the dark dust band showing just below its core. This galaxy rotates in two different directions at the same time. The inner disk rotates one way while the outer disk, marked by spiral arms seen here, rotates the other.

12 1/2" Ritchey Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8,F/6 LRGB (25/7minBW,5/5min bin RG,2x2 bin8/5minB.)

  M66 - Color

This spiral galaxy features 2 main arms. The one shown at the top is elongated, and also, seems to have been pulled above the main disk of the galaxy. Astronomers ascribe this to the gravitational forces of one or both of M66's large, neighbor galaxies.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB (40/7minBW,5/10min2x2bin RGB. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0, G 1.0. B 1.6).

  M74 - Color

Named "The Perfect Galaxy" by some astronomers because of its wonderfully symmetrical design. This galaxy shows its reddish "HII" regions along its winding arm structure in this 9 hour exposure.

Takahashi CCA-250 telescope with an ST11000 and Astrodon filters. F/7.5 LRGB (51/7minBW,12/5min2x2bin RGB.).

  M81 - Color

The "flagship" galaxy of the Ursa Major Group. The outer arms are lit with a bluish color due to the presence of young, blue/white stars. Note the small yellowish "mini-bar" structure in the core of the galaxy. Heavy use of Digital Development was employed to bring out central region details.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8, F/7&f6 LRGB (45/7min BW,8/5 minRG,12/5minB with the RGB components binned 2x2).

  M82 - Color

A close passage to M81 some 5 million years ago has left this galaxy in chaos. Called the "Starburst Galaxy" we can see the core is undergoing a volcano-like eruption spewing material out into space for thousands of light years.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8, F/6 Ha/R+GB (31/7minHa,14/7minR + 6/7min G,B components binned 2x2. Scaled on MaximDL at Ha .19,G 5,B 6.5).

  M83 - Color

Considered the best example of an "Sc" spiral nebula seen face-on. Note the prominent central bar running through the galaxy connecting the two major arms, which are lit with multiple red "HII" regions.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8,F/7 LRGB (15/7minBW, 3/5minR&G,5/5minB with RGB components binned 2x2.)

  M88 - Color

This is a tightly wound spiral that lies a considerable distance away - 60 million light years. Its general shape resembles our own galaxy. Note the blob like object to the right in the picture. This is the distant galaxy PGC 169494. Other fainter galaxies can also be seen in the image.. 

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a STL11000 with Astrodon filters. F/6 LRGB(47/7minBW,9/5min RGB binned 2x2.

 

  M94 - Color

This is a face-on "star-burst ring" galaxy that lies about 15 million light years away. The major arms appear to be interlaced or "braided" as columns of gas, and dust cross them. Note the red   HII regions interspersed throughout the encircling spiral arms.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/9 LRGB (40/7minBW,10/5min2x2binned RGB. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0, G 1.0 and B1.6.)

  M 97 - Color

The "Owl" is a planetary nebula only 2000 ly away. It has a bipolar structure to it, which creates the cavities that represent the Owl's "eyes".

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB (30/7min BW, 7/5minRGB binned 2x2. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0, G 1.0, B 1.6)

  M100 - Color

A beautiful face-on spiral that reveals its core region nicely in this image. The small bright "mini-bar" in the heart of the galaxy is surrounded by a CNR (circumnuclear ring of glowing segments). M100 is an active "star making machine" with new stars being formed in the CNR and in the pink "H II  Regions" in the spiral arms.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB (24x7minBW,5x5minR&G,8x5minB with RGB components binned 2x2.

  M101 - Color

Another superb example of a "grand design" spiral. Here we can clearly see the anatomy of a spiral galaxy with its great blue stretches in the outer arms where young blue/white stars dominate, the reddish H II regions along the central sections of the arms, and the old yellow/white stars packed tightly in the core. Note the outer arm on the bottom left side has been sprung away from the main body due to the nearby passage of another galaxy.  

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST11000/Astrodon filters,F/6 LRGB (45x7minBW, 11x5minR,G,Bbinned 2x2,

  M104 - Color

In this image The "Sombrero" galaxy looks more like a circle of light than a hat. This huge spiral galaxy, perhaps 3 times the size of our own, is seen edge-on. M104 may contain 500-600 billion solar systems.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/7 LRGB (25/7min BW, 5/5min RG, 8/5minB with the RGB components binned 2x2.)

  NGC 0253 - Color

The Sculptor Galaxy is one of the largest in the southern hemisphere. It is a "star burst" galaxy with its central region alive with star birth activity. Here we can see clumps of bright red emission nebulas that populate the galaxy with new stars.

12 1/2"Ritchey- Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8, F/6 LRGB (32/7minBW, 9/5min 2x2 bin RGB, Scaled on Maxim DL at R 1.0, G 1.0 and B 1.6).

  NGC 0281 - Color

A hydrogen emission nebula in Cassiopeia. Note the clumps of interstellar dust that stand out against the glowing red background.

12 1/2"Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8, F/5.7RRGB (12x7minR,3x5min2x2RG, 5/5min2x2B).

  NGC 0613 - Color

A beautiful barred spiral at 64 million ly away. I've dubbed this one the "Whip Tail Galaxy" because it seems to be  hurling a bright star from the end of one of its long spiral arms.

12 1/2"Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with  a ST10XE/CFW8, F/6LRGB (50/7minBW, 11/5minRGB2x2bin,.Scaled on Maxim DL at R1.0,G1.0, B1.6).

   

NGC 0772 - Color

This wonderful spiral galaxy resembles the figure "9". It lies 114 million ly away, and is 2.24 times the size of the Milky Way.

Note one arm has been sprung away from the main body due to the near passage of another galaxy in the distant  past.

12 1/2"Ritchey - Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8. F/6LRGB(47/7minBW, 11/5minRGB2x2bin. Scaled on Maxim DL at R1.0, G1.0, B1.6)

 

  NGC 0891 - Color

Another example of a spiral seen edge-on. Note the dense arm of dust bisecting the galaxy's glowing core.

Takahashi CCA-250 Astrograph with an ST11000 camera and Astrodon filters. F/7.5 :RGB (43/7min BW, 10/5min2x2binRGB)

  NGC 0884&0869 - Color

The Double Cluster in Persesus. The two clusters show a remarkable variation in star colors from young, extremely hot blue/white stars to old red giants.

4"Televue refractor with ST10XE/CFW8. F/4.3 RGB (6/1minR,G,10/1minB ).

  NGC 0985 -Color

A rare "collision ring galaxy" lying at 566  million ly. A somewhat smaller, but high density "intruder" galaxy has plunged through the center of the host  spiral. The ring is caused by a compression wave driven outward by the intruder at impact. This triggers star formation in the material composing the outer ring.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB (50/7minBW, 11/5min RGB 2x2 bin. Scaled on Maxim DL at R 1.0, G 1.0, B 1.6). 

  NGC 1232 - Color

A striking open face spiral galaxy with multiple arms. Note smaller galaxy in distance on right side of image.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8,F/7 LRGB (23/7min BW, 5/5min RG 2x2 bin, 8/5min B2x2 bin).

  NGC 1300 - Color

A strong bar runs almost vertically through this spiral galaxy. It lies 61 million light years away in the constellation of Eridanus, the river.

 

12 1/2 " Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8. F/7 LRGB (48/7 min BW,9/5min RGB2x2. Scaled on Maxim DL at 1.0R, 1.0G, 1.6 B

  NGC 1365 - Color 

Considered the archetypical example of a barred spiral galaxy. The sharply angled arm structure, and prominent bar are the result of being perturbed by interaction with the other galaxies in the Fornax cluster. This object lies well down toward the horizon at -36 Deg. Declination here in Naples, FL.

 

12 1/2"Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8.F/6 LRGB (31/7min BW, 7/5minRGB2x2 bin scaled on MaximDL at 1.0R,1.0G and 1.6B.)

  NGC 1532 - Color

The larger spiral is drawing the smaller galaxy on top towards it. Note the material already being transferred from the smaller one, and the up tilting of the back left spiral arm on the larger one. The arm is being distorted by the gravitational pull of the small galaxy.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8. F/6LRGB (58/7min BW,12/5minRGB2x2 bin scaled on Maxim DL at 1.0R,1.0G and 1.6B) 

  NGC 1977 - Color

Called "The Running Man". A dramatic combination of a reflective blue nebula in the foreground superimposed over a magenta colored emission nebula in the background. The "Running Man" can be seen moving from right to left . He appears to be running through a light blue fog which rises around him.

Takahashi CCA-250 Astrograph with an ST11000 camera, and Astrodon filters. F/5 LRGB(30/6minavgBW,6/5min2x2bin RGB.

  "Alnitak's World"

The easternmost star in Orion's belt is a brilliant, blue/white one named Altinak.  The region surrounding it ("Alnitak's World") is rich in celestial features. This includes the "Flame" and "Horsehead" nebulas. Note the billowing effect in the dark, reddish wall of space dust that dominates the bottom half of the image. The scene contains both emission and reflection nebulas.

Takahashi CCA-250 Astrograph with an ST11000 camera, and Astrodon filters F/ 3.6. LRGB (30/5minBW, 5/5min2x2binRGB).

  NGC 2024 - Color

This object resembles a burning torch. It is aptly named "The Flame Nebula". Heavy dust lanes darken a field of glowing hydrogen gas. Cooler areas in the nebula collapse giving rise to newborn stars.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien  Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8, F5/7 RRGB(4/7minR,2/5min2x2bin RGB)

  NGC 2237 - Color

The "Rosette Nebula" is the largest nebula visible in the northern hemispheres of the world. A cluster of hot, blue/white "O" class stars have excavated the central part of this giant object 

Takahashi CCA-250 telescope with an ST11000 camera and Astrodon filters. F/3.6 LRGB(30/7min BW, 7/5min2x2binRGB).

  NGC 2264 - Color

Usually called the "Cone Nebula" - Robert Burnham used the more prosaic title "The Throne of God" to describe this magnificent feature found amid gas, dust and new stars in the constellation of Monoceros. To my imagination the object resembles some short winged, flightless, 3 eyed creature forever staring up at the brilliant, type "O" star above it.

Takahashi CCA-250 Astrograph telescope with an STL11000 camera, and Astrodon filters .F7.5 LRGB30/7minBW, 7/5min 2x2binRGB.

  NGC 2359 - Color

A Wolf-Rayet star is "blowing bubbles" on its way to a probable supernova explosion. It is the white star in the central part of the "teal" colored bubble. The teal or aquamarine color denotes double ionized oxygen, and the reddish regions are ionized hydrogen. Both are caused by the radiation flooding from the Wolf-Rayet star into a neighboring molecular cloud. (Object is also called "Thor's Helmet".)

Takahashi CCA-250 telescope with an STL11000 camera, and Astrodon filters. F/5 LRGB(30/7 minBW, 5/5min2x2binRGB).

  NGC 2392 - Color

The "Clown Face" nebula in the constellation of Gemini. This is a classic planetary nebula - or dying star that is in the process of puffing out its body in a series of rings.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an  ST8e/CFW8, F/7 LRGB (4/7min BW,1/5min 2x2bin RGB)

  NGC 2419 - Color

This globular cluster of stars lies a mind boggling 300,000 light years above the plane of the Milky Way. Astronomers once debated its gravitational attachment to our galaxy, and suggested that it might lie between galaxies - giving it its old name of "The Galactic Wanderer".

Takahashi CCA-250 telescope with an ST11000 camera and Astrodon filters. F/7.5 LRGB(15/7min BW, 3/5min2x2binRGB) 

  NGC 2467 - Color

This nebula shows a variety of stages of star formation. Note the intense area shaped like a white cross, where young stars are just emerging. Above the main nebula a little to the right you can see a blue/white star coming out of a donut shaped feature, and further to the right of it a small star cluster emerging from a larger donut.

12 1/2' Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB (Halpha 38/7 min, 6/5 min G,B binned 2x2. Scaled on MaximDL at Ha 1.0, G 1.0, B 1.6).

 

  NGC 2613 & ESO495-17- Color

Two edge-on spiral galaxies appear to float past behind a wall of dim blue and white stars in this heavily populated section of the constellation Pyxis.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8,F/6 LRGB (25/7min BW, 5/5min RGB 2x2bin,8/5minB 2x2bin).

  NGC 2835 - Color

A beautiful, grand design spiral galaxy in the constellation "Hydra". It lies about 35 million light years away, and is about 2/3rds the size of our Milky Way. Note the two bright 10th magnitude stars that stand like sentinels on either side.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telscope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB (44/7min BW, 10/5min RGB  2c2bin. Scaled on MaximDL at 1.0 R, 1.0 G, 1.6 B.)

 

  NGC 2903 - Color

A "barred" spiral galaxy in Leo. Astronomers believe that the barred shape is a balancing feature employed when a galaxy undergoes destabilization due to the influence of another galaxy in its local group.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8, F/7 LRGB (9/5min BW 3/5min 2x2 bin RGB)

  NGC 2997 - Color

This beautiful "grand design" spiral lies well down in the southern skies in the constellation Antlia, "the air pump". Note the pink blotches in the arms where the H II regions for this galaxy are producing new stars.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8, F/6 LRGB 41/7 min B/W 8/5 min R,G & 14/5min B with color images in 2x2 bin).

  NGC 3184 - Color

A very symmetrical, open faced spiral with 2 prominent arms. It lies about 40 million ly away in Ursa Major.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6L LRGB 41/7min B/W,10/5 min R,G,B binned 2x2. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0, G 1.0, B 1.6).

  NGC 3190 - Hickson Group - Color

This interacting group consists of 4 galaxies - 3 spirals and 1 elliptical, It lies at a distance of 60 million light years away. Note the agitated state of the main galaxy (red emission activity along its edge) as the distance closes between it, and the "lawn sprinkler" shaped galaxy below it.

Takahashi CCA-250 telescope with an ST11000 camera and Astrodon filters. F/7.5 LRGB(45/7min BW, 10/5min2x2binRGB).

 

  NGC 3198 - Color

 

A grand design spiral in Ursa Major displaying classic spiral colors from the core out to its far reaches. Cepheid star measurements put its distance at 47 million light y4ears away.

Takahashi CCA-250 telescope with an ST11000 camera and Astrodon filters. F7.5LRGB( 4/7minBW, 10/5min2x2binRGB).

  NGC 3227 - Color

77 million ly away a spiral galaxy is absorbing a dwarf elliptical galaxy. Close examination of the image makes it appear that the dwarf is in the foreground. The giant "plumes" on all sides of the spiral probably are related to approach of this small, but dense object.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB 51/7minB/W,12/5min R,G,B binned 2x2. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0,G 1.0,B 1.6)

  NGC 3242 - Color

Another dying star - looking a little like the CBS logo. Our own star, the sun, will go through such a process in about 5 billion years.)

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8, F/7 LRGB (1/3minBW, 1min 2x2bin  RGB)

  NGC 3521 - Color

This is an example of a "flocculent spiral" galaxy. Most spirals are dominated by 2 major arms. Flocculents have a series of fragmented, loosely organized arms that give a "bunched up" appearance as they circle the nucleus. They also have a higher "halo to disk ratio" than other spirals.

12 1/2"Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB (43/7minBW,10/5minRGB 2x2 bin. Scaled on MaximDL at 1.0R,1.0G,and 1.6B).

  NGC 3511 & 3513 - Color

Two spiral galaxies tilted at different angles to us. Note that the one on the right shows a bluish appearance due to its "face-on" orientation. NGC 3511, on the left, is tilted. Its color is more red since more of the light waves have to travel through its mid-plane dust layer.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB (43/7minBW,10/5minRGB 2x2 bin. Scaled on MaximDL at 1.0R,1.0G and 1.6 B.)

  NGC 3628 - Color

This edge-on spiral has its wings distorted due to interaction with other members of its local group of galaxies. The gravitational waves from these other bodies has twisted, and ballooned out the galaxy's outer regions. 

Takahashi CCA-250 telescope with images combined from a 12 1/2"Richey-Chretien telescope. ST11000 camera with Astrodon filters. LRGB with total exposure time of 49/7minBW,10/5min2x2binRGB.

  NGC 3938 - Color

A beautiful spiral galaxy lying deep in a field of stars. NGC 3938 is about 43 million light years away. For perspective, the bright star in the upper left of the picture lies only 140 light years away.

 

12 1/2 " Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6LRGB(43/7minL, 10/5min2x2RGB scaled on Maxim DL at 1.3R, 1.0G and 1.7B.

  Abell 21 - Color

14,000 years ago the small, blue star in the heart of this image began to puff off its outer surface. The star still glows blue because it is a high mass end PNe star. Note the "lopsided" appearance of the expanding shell of material. The density of space is different on either side of the star - thicker to the left side where the material is piling up like a traffic jam, and thinner to the right where the shell has mostly dissipated.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 RRGB (19/7minR,5/5min2x2RGB scaled on MaximDL at 1.3R,1.0G, and 1.7B.

  Arp 273 - Color

24 million light years away two spiral galaxies interact with each other in a pre-collision "waltz". The gravitational force between the two has already formed a "tidal bridge" connecting them, and the smaller one is pulling the lower arm of the large one out like a strand of  spaghetti

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an  ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB(30/7minL,7/5min2x2RGB scaled on MaximDL at 1.0R,1.0G and 1.6B.

  Barnard 72 - Color

The constellation "Ophiuchus" means the  "Serpent Bearer". Fittingly, it contains Barnard's "Snake" Nebula. This is a winding, dust filled region lying in a star crowded field toward the center of our galaxy.

4" Televue refractor with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/4.3LRGB (6/5 minL, 1/5min2x2RGB scaled on MaximDL at 1.0R,1.0G and 1.6B.

  Lynds Dark Nebula 781 - Color

An unusual object in the constellation Auriga. This is a large, oblong shaped, dust cloud that forms a dark region in the heart of the picture. It is surrounded by a nice field of colored stars. As the dust condenses in clumps, cools, and collapses new stars will be born in Lynds Dark Nebula 781 adding to the stellar population of the region.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8, F/6 LRGB(6/7minL,5/5min2x2RGB scaled on MaximDL at 1.0R, 1.0G and 1.6B.

  IC342 - Color

A beautiful, face-on spiral galaxy seen behind a dense, star field. Note the narrow bar structure in the core which connects to the thin, dark, pencil-like arms just above, and below the core. The magenta colored patches in the spiral arms are HII regions.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8. F/7 LRGB(38/7minBW,5/5min2x2 bin RG, 8/5min 2x2 bin B).

    IC405 - Color

The "Flaming Star" nebula. A run-away star has crossed from the constellation Orion over to Auriga. It has encountered a nebula, and is illuminating the tops of the clouds reflecting back the brilliant blue color of the star. Its radiation is ionizing the nebula which is causing it to glow red.

Takahashi CCA-250 Astrograph Telescope with an ST1100/Astrodon filters. F3.6/LRGB(30/7minB/W,7/5min2x2binRGB).

 

  IC410 - Color

The open star cluster NGC1893, packed together in the center of the image, radiates ultraviolet energy in all directions, ionizing the emission nebula IC410. Note the 2 features in the bottom right hand quadrant of the picture. Looking to the fanciful eye like a tadpole, and a frog these formations are composed of denser material in the nebula that have not yet been blown away by the stellar radiation from the open cluster. Behind them twisted tails of gas and dust meander through the image.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB (46/7minBW,10/5min2x2 bin RGB weighted  R 0.8,G 1.0, B 1.3)

  IC 434 (Horsehead Nebula) - Color

A striking formation of interstellar gas and dust that resembles the shape of a horse's head. 

 

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8,F/7LRGB 20/7min BW, 4/5min 2x2 bin RG. 6/5min 2x2 bin B.

  IC 443 (The Jelly Fish Nebula) - Color

An expanding supernova remnant left over from an explosion 35,000 years ago. Most neutron stars left over from supernova explosions are still found near the center of the explosion site.The Chandra Xray telescope has identified the culprit star in IC443 at a considerable distance from the center at about 4:00, making it a runaway star.

4" Televue Refractor with a ST10XE/CFW8/F/5.4 H-alphaRGB42/5minHalpha,10/5minRGB 2x2bin.

 

  IC2177 -Color

This object is found in the northern region of the "Gum Nebula", IC2177. The dark feature is a dust lane, running like a river behind the central star.

12 1/2"Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/ CFW8. F/6 LRGB (39/7minBW, 9/5minRGB 2x2 bin.. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0,G 1.0,B 1,6.)

 

  IC1396A - Color

A bright rimmed globule of dark dust and gas in the constellation Cepheus. Intense stellar winds from a bright star off to the left of the picture are striking the object creating a "bow wave" effect. The dark areas consist of evaporated gas and dust that sweep back from the dark head to form a kind of "tadpole" appearance.

12 1/2"Ritchey- Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/ CFW8. F/6 LRGB (28/7minBW,6/5min 2x2bin RG, 10/5min 2x2bin B).

 

IC 5070 (The Pelican Nebula - Color

This nebula resembles the head of a giant pelican. Note the dark dust lanes throughout the glowing red field of hydrogen gas.

 

4" Televue Refractor with  ST10-XE/CFW8/F /5.4RRGB (24/5minR,7/3minRG2x2bin, 11/3min B2x2 bin).

  IC5146 (The Cocoon Nebula) - Color

The central star has burned a "blister" into the center of this beautiful nebula allowing us to see some of the features behind it. A reflection nebula is superimposed over an emission nebula. Note the swarm of small, dimmer stars surrounding the central star. They are quite young, some only about 1 million years old.

Takahashi CCA-250 Astrograph with an ST11000 camera. F/5 LRGB (30/7minB/W,7/5minbin2x2RGB)

  NGC 4298&4302 - Color

Two spiral galaxies approach collision  with each other behind a sparse field of bright stars. The scene of the accident is 53 million light years away, and by now the two galaxies have most likely merged to form a single, new massive system.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8. F/6LRGB  (44/7minBW,10/5minRGB. binned 2x2. Scaled on MaximDL at R1.0,G 1.0,B.1.6).

  NGC 4565 - Color

This beautiful "edge-on" galaxy has the same approximate appearance, and diameter as our own Milky Way galaxy. Note the small, faint blue smudge on the bottom of the image. This is a distant  irregular galaxy.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8, F/5.7 LRGB 15/7min BW,3/5min 2x2 binRGB

  NGC4725 - Color

Considered to be a "near ring" galaxy. It lies 42 million light years away, and its diameter is about 20% larger than our own galaxy. The main ring is studded with bright, newly coined stars, giving it a vibrant blue color.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6LRGB (42/7minBW, 30/5minRGB binned 2x2. Scaled on Maxim DL at R1.0,G1.0, B1.6)

  NGC 5128 - Color

One of the most curious galaxies in the southern sky. A large ball of light bisected by a prominent dust band. This object is a very strong radio source, and astronomers detect a "rumbling" sound coming from its center. It is believed to be the collision of an edge-on spiral galaxy with an elliptical one.

12 1/2' Ritchey Chretien Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8,F/7 LRGB(6/7min B/W, 2/5min 2x2bin  RGB)

  NGC 5139 (Omega Centauri) - Color

This giant globular cluster contains over 10 million stars. The majority are Population II stars. They include red giants over 10 billion years old, approaching the end of their stellar lives.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a  ST10XE/CFW8 ,F/6 RGB(2/5min2x2bin.RGB weighted 1.0R,1.0G, 1.65B)

  NGC 6888 - Color

The "Crescent " nebula is the expanding remnant of a supernova explosion. It is located in a magnificent area in Cygnus where the stars are massed tightly together.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST8E/CFW8.F/5.7LRGB(6/7minBW,3/5min2x2RGB)

  NGC 6946 - Color

The "Firecracker Galaxy" is called that because of the glowing red HII regions that are spotted along its beautiful spiral arms. They look like strings of firecrackers going off. 

Also note the wide variety of star colors in the foreground.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST8E/CFW8.F/6LRGB(47/7minBW, 11/5min2x2R,G,B. Scaled on Maxim DL at 1.0 R, 1.0 G, 1.6 B)

  NGC 6960 - Color

The "Veil Nebula" is an old supernova remnant threading its way across the constellation Cygnus. The entire nebula is quite large covering an area equivalent to about 6 full moons. This section of it is referred to as the "Western Veil".

Takahashi CCA-250 Telescope with an ST11000 camera and Astrodon filters. F/5LRGB(30/7min B/W,9/5min2x2binRGB).

  NGC 6992 - Color

The "Eastern Veil" nebula is shown here. Supernova remnants like this scatter heavy elements such as gold, silver, uranium, and titanium etc. into space for incorporation into future solar systems.

 

Takahshi CCA-250 Telescope with an ST11000camera and Astrodon filters. F/5LRGB(30/7minBW,9/5min2x2binRGB)

  NGC 7000 - Color

The "North American Nebula" is another region in Cygnus where stars are tightly massed, and embedded in nebulosity. This object mimics a large scale map of North America.

Televue 4" Refractor with ST10-XE/CFW8/F/4.3RRGB(15/5 minR,4/3minRG2x2bin, 6/3minB 2x2 bin)

  NGC 7023 - Color

The "Iris" Nebula is a striking reflection nebula about 1400 light years away. Like a fog light the hot, central star illuminates the giant dust cloud surrounding it. Note the pink sections which comprise a small HII emission region surrounding the star.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6LRGB(20/7minBW,5/5min2x2 RGB. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0, G 1.0, B1.6).

  NGC 7380 - Color

An interesting celestial "intersection" in Cepheus where emission and reflection nebulas are interacting with each other.

 

4" Televue Refractor with ST10XE/CFW8. F/5.4LRGB. 48/5min BW,8/5min2x2 bin RGB.Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0, G 1.0 , B 1.6.

  NGC 7293 - Color

The "Helix" nebula in Aquarius. At 694 light years away this the closest planetary nebula. The double coil of radiating gas is expanding outward from the dying star in the center. "Cometary knots" can be seen inside the edge of the ring.

12 1/2" Ritchey Chretien Telescope with a ST10XE/CFW8,  F/6LRGB(45/7minBW, 10/5min2x2RGB. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0,G 1.0, B 1.6).

  NGC 7479 - Color

A distant, barred spiral in the constellation Pegasus. Striking two arm structure.

 

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST8e/CFW8, F/7 LRGB(15/7minBW,3/5min2x2RGB).

  NGC 7635 - Color

Material shaped like a "bubble" is seen being ejected out of a Wolf-Rayet star.

 

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8,F/6 LRGB(50/7minBW,10/5min2x2bin R,G,B. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0, G 1.0, B 1.6).

  Sharpless 2-106 - Color

This object is a "bi-polar nebula". A young, very large star is sending enormous amounts of ultraviolet radiation into space. It is surrounded by a belt of extremely dense dust which in turn is redirecting the radiation out from its poles. Eventually, the gas and dust in the belt or"waist" area will coalesce into planets, moons, comets etc, and circle the star. For now it totally masks the star.

12 1/2"Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8.F/6 LRGB(30/7minBW.7/5min2x2bin R,G,B. Scaled on Maxim DL at R 1.0,G 1.0, B 1.6)

  Sharpless 2-136 - Color

Dust interacting with a light reflection nebula gives this area in Cepheus a wonderful "palette" to display its faint field stars A dark figure, like the maw of some celestial leviathan, seems to be reaching upwards for a star.

4" Televue Refractor with ST10XE/CFW8/F4.3LRGB 60/5minBW,10/5min2x2binRGB. Scaled on MaximDLat R 1.0, G 1.0 and B 1.6.

 

  Sharpless 2-301 - Color

The nebula sits like a red pin cushion in a star spangled field. This object is located in Canis Major.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6LRGB(30/7minBW,7/5min2x2binRGB. Scaled on MaximDL at R1.0, G1.0, B 1.6).

  Sharpless 2-311 - Color

An emission nebula lying down in the constellation of Puppis. Note the variety of star colors throughout the image. Numerous yellow/white sun-like stars are mingled with bright blue "O" types, and reddish stars that range across the entire landscape - or "starscape".

 

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB(26/7minBW, 4/5min2x2bin R,G, 7/5min2x2binB).

  UGC 2885 - Color

The largest spiral galaxy in the known universe. This giant is some 800,000 light years across, and has a mass equivalent to 2 trillion solar systems. It lies 307 million light years away.

12 1'2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST10XE/CFW8. F/6 LRGB(44/7minBW, 10/5min2x2bin RGB. Scaled on MaximDL at R 1.0, G 1.0, B 1.6.)

  Witch Head Nebula - Color

A beautiful reflection nebula illuminated by the bright star "Rigel". The blue color is from starlight scattered off dust grains which scatter shorter wave lengths that are closer to the grain size. To see the Witch's Head go to the bright orange star in the center (its in her jaw), and come up a distance to the right to see her blue nose jutting out into space. 

Takahashi CCA-250 Astrograph telescope with an ST11000 camera and Astrodon filters. F3.5 LRGB(26/7minb/w.6/5min bin2x2RGB)

  Moon - Bay of Rainbows - B&W

The "bay" was formed by an ancient meteorite strike. On the top side the rim rises to a height of about 16,000 feet while the lower side has been covered by an ancient lava flow that seeped up from  beneath the moon's crust

12 1/2" Ritchey Chretien Telescope with an ST8e, aperture reduction method (.11 sec BW)

  Moon - Apennine Mountains - B&W

This spectacular range of lunar mountains stretches 420 miles long, and its highest peak reaches 18,500 feet.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with a Luminera Skynyx 2.0 camera. (450/.12sec exposures. Best 10% combined.)

  Moon - Schroter's Valley- B&W

Note the long rill making a half circle. This is Schroter's Valley. It winds its way for about 70 miles, and has a measured depth of about 4500 feet.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST8e, 1.8 X Barlow (.11 sec BW)

  Moon - Craters Alphonsus & Arzachel - B&W

These two craters display their differences in age. The bottom (Arzachel) is younger than the middle one (Alphonsus). Note Arzachel's walls are more rugged, and its central peak better preserved. The length of the wall's shadows indicate greater height (about 10,000 feet high vs the Alphonsus walls which rise to about 7,000 feet).

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope with an ST8e, 5X Barlow (.11 sec BW)

  Sun - Color

This image shows a dramatic "arc" prominence. I've named it "Hole in the Wall".

80mm TMB refractor with a Lumenera Skynyx 2.1 camera and Coronado 60mm Ha double stack filters. Best 400 of 2000 12/1000 to 35/1000 sec.exposures. 

  Sun - Color

"Filaments" become "prominences" when they rotate over the rim of the sun, and can be seen against the background of space. Here is a chain of filaments seen in this transition.

80mm TMB refractor with a Lumenera Skynyx 2.1 camera and Coronado 60mm Ha double stack filters. Best 400 of 2000 12/1000 sec. exposures. 

 

 

  Sun - Color

While their is no combustion on the surface of the sun - this giant prominence looks like a  "wall of fire".

80mm Stellarvue refractor with a Lumenera Skynyx 2.1 camera and Coronado 60mm Ha single filter. Best 400 of 2000 12/1000 to 35/1000  sec. exposures. 

  Mars - Color

This image was taken at the Florida Gulf Coast University with their new 16" Ritchey-Chretien telescope during the close passage of Mars in early Sept. '03. It shows the  dark peninsula-like feature "Syrtis Major" jutting upward, along with the shrinking southern polar cap.

16" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope. Fauerbach, Mon, and Wolfe collaborated in taking and processing this F/17 image composed of 690 stacked 25/100sec shots with a Phillips Toucam camera.

  Jupiter - Color

The largest planet in the solar system with a diameter of 88,865 miles - Jupiter rotates in only 9.8 hours. Note "The Great Red Spot" on the bottom right side of the planet. This cyclone-like storm in Jupiter's atmosphere has existed for at least 300 years.

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope @F/27 with a Toucam camera. 383 stacked images @ 15 frames per second

  Saturn - Color

The 6th planet out from the sun, the "Ring World". Note that the inner ring is considerably brighter than the outer one. This is because larger ice fragments, which reflect light more, compose the inner ring, while finer ones make up the outer ring.

 

12 1/2" Ritchey-Chretien Telescope @F/27 with a Toucam camera. 89 stacked images @25 frames per second.

 

 

 
 
 
   
 
 
 

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